The Huckabay Teaching Fellowship
The Huckabay Teaching Fellowship
The Huckabay Teaching Fellowship

The Huckabay Teaching Fellowship

Fellowship (2008-09)

The UW Graduate School

During the 2008-09 academic year, I collaborated with Matthew W. Wilson (Geography) as a University of Washington Huckabay Teaching Fellow to design and implement an intensive undergraduate course in the digital humanities at the University of Washington (UW). With Huckabay support, I was able to dedicate an entire quarter solely to digital humanities pedagogy and project planning. Ultimately titled “Mapping the Digital Humanities,” the course was the first of its kind at the UW, and it asked students to collaboratively and individually approach undergraduate research and new media through various trajectories in mapping, including geographical, textual, and conceptual approaches to visualization.

Wilson and I later presented our work at the UW’s iSchool (as a talk titled “Project-Based Approaches to the Digital Humanities”) and at the HASTAC III conference (at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign). I also submitted an entry on the project to Project Bamboo.

What I Learned

My time spent designing “Mapping the Digital Humanities” allowed me to refine my pedagogy, reflect on how to slow down and explain modes of inquiry to students, and articulate how I teach, why I teach. As a Huckabay Fellow, I also had the opportunity to communicate with other fellows (from Women Studies, Biology, Education, and elsewhere) about their pedagogy at a Research I University. During these conversations, I had to first explain why the digital humanities matter, not to mention why undergraduate courses in the field should exist. Such cross-disciplinary engagements helped me become more self-confident both in the digital humanities classroom and out.

Since the Fellowship

Wilson and I have continued to integrate neo-geography into our research and pedagogy. For instance, see Wilson’s “Participatory Mapping” as well as my 2011 Introduction to Digital Humanities course at the University of Victoria. We also collaboratively contributed to The New Work of Composing. Elsewhere, in 2011, I discussed our Huckabay project with UW’s College of Arts and Sciences.

(The first image on the left is a cropped version of a picture taken by Christian Fischer. The second and third images are screen shots of the “Mapping the Digital Humanities” course blog, which I designed.)